elle luna the 100 day project

100 days of my favourite words by daintydora

“Words, like glass, darken whatever they do not help us to see.”

– Joubert, Pensees

Thank you to Gretchen Rubin's daily happiness email for that thoughtful quote. But it's true isn't it?

When I decided to use words as the focus of my 100-day project for 2016, I understood the inherent power they yield.

Today is 100/100 and the word I've chosen to celebrate my achievement is 'Firework', because it connotes celebration, success, happiness - and on this occasion perhaps even a whiff of relief. This day has (finally) arrived.

It also conjures the joy of bright colour on a dark night, childish excitement, danger, power, spontaneity, laughter and that smell of sulphur in the air. I think words can do all those things too.

Some days I've been playful, optimistic and creative with my word choice; other days I've been a bit darker in tone, bringing the etymological force of the English language to bear. Hopefully in both cases I've inspired others with my 'daily habit' linked so intrinsically to my life as a writer. (Hello 'Alphabet' - I couldn't have done it without you.)

In some cases, perhaps I've even introduced a new word to someone, taking them on a brief journey of exploration or an unexpected linguistic tangent? I'd like to think so. (I'm looking at you, 'Petrichor'.)

And isn't it funny how when you focus on a word - perhaps a word that doesn't crop up in every-day language, like 'ekphrastic' or 'chiaroscuro' or even 'synchronicity' itself - it suddenly appears everywhere as if to say 'here I am, look at me' (use me! play with me!)?

I do have a predilection for personification. I try to resist, but find the new depth - often world - of meaning a personifying verb or adjective brings to the intangible 'inanimates' of life...irresistible:

Thoughts that leap. Memories that stir. Happiness that soars. The 'demonic' inner critic. Grrr.

So here we are. 100 days deep in words. See the rest of the pack via my Instagram profile, or search under #100daysofmyfavouritewords (there's definitely 100 - I checked!)

A big shout-out to Elle Luna who started the 100-day project, and all the creative friends who shared the journey with me.

Finally, check out last year's '100 days of Haiku'. What will next year bring?

Midweek Poetry: 100 days of Haiku for the 100 day project by daintydora

I did it! We did it! So many people did it! Every day from 6th April - 14th July I wrote a haiku poem and posted it on Instagram for accountability using #100daysofhaiku.

It was just a small thing, a few lines, simple arrangements of words; frivolous noticings shot through with emotional outpourings in only 17 syllables each time: 5-7-5.

The 100 day project was dreamed up by Elle Luna and The Great Discontent.

The point was about fostering a habit and committing to yourself and your creativity, being vulnerable and doing it anyway. There's going to be #100day parties around the world!

I'm seriously struggling to pick a favourite but one of them is definitely from the giddy first days of the project, Day 9:

 

As time spins by in a whirlwind of action and doing and chatter and ideas, it seems particularly to resonate for me just now.

And I'm including yesterday's, handily written into my Mslexia writer's diary, because it was inspired by a true story which I plan to one day include in the novel (trilogy?) of my family 'saga':

 

What's been really special about the project is being aware of my surroundings each day and consciously thinking about my haiku-habit and what I will write about (other days, super-busy days, it's been a bit of a...last minute thing...)

But it's similar to the mindful writing exercise 'small stones' that my friend Vikki told me about last year. The idea being to always carry a notebook and write down the little things that you notice, the 'small stones' of your day.

As a writer, the small stones can often become big stones that could then become the ideas for a short story or a novel, or perhaps a tiny book. Who knows. But you don't want to lose those little pre-polished nuggets of stone because one day they could be gold.

And that's how I've come to think of my haiku - like panning for gold at the end of the day.

A writer and an alchemist in one. Stones, birds, time, emotions, thoughts, love.

I'll definitely do more haiku poetry. After a breather. And I'm going to put them all together into a handy haiku e-book to give away free. So there we go: a tiny book from a proud creative achievement.

Meanwhile, I didn't win the Synaesthesia Magazine poetry competition. But I was a finalist and that meant a lot. Congrats to the winner and runners up.

I'm not sad. Well I am a bit disappointed.

I'm just going to have to find more 'small stones' to spin into gold.